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How to help kids feel compassion for people across the world?

The other day, I told my 5 year old about the unexpected freezing weather in parts of America right now. I shared with her how my sister and her husband in Illinois are looking out for their chickens, bunnies and birds to help them stay warm and safe through the unexpected cold.


She immediately seemed so concerned for the animals and said things like "Poor birds. Poor chickens. I hope they are warm and safe." And during her bedtime prayer, she sent a wish to the universe to protect the animals, their mommies, dadas and their babies.


I know animals are not technically 'people'. However, her immediate compassion for other living beings across the country is something to explore.


Why and how did she feel so connected to animals she has never met or known?


Through her connection with nature...


I would argue that one of the best ways to teach our kids how to feel compassion for people across the world, is by helping them stay connected to nature as much as possible.


Because nature connection and walks are such a high priority for our family, she sees the same birds in our backyard in the backyards of Illinois. I don't feel I needed to teach compassion literally. I believe that completely innate for these little ones.


They just need our guidance in connecting them to things like nature... and the rest they will discover on their own.


This is why at Hatch Brighter, one of the most powerful tools we seek to give your kids is this magnificent habit of staying connected to nature. If this sparks your curiosity, I encourage you to try one of our 10-minute nature activities through this free printable pdf or download the 'Hatch Brighter' app on your app store to explore the many options available for you.


Shine on!

Amna

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